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"Here lies Phaethon: In Helius' car he fared
And though he greatly failed, more greatly dared."

Anyone whose goal is ‘something higher’ must expect someday to suffer vertigo. What is vertigo? Fear of falling? No, Vertigo is something other than fear of falling. It is the voice of the emptiness below us which tempts and lures us, it is the desire to fall, against which, terrified, we defend ourselves.

—Milan Kundera, The Unbearable Lightness of Being (via entropy-entropy)

(via tectusregis)

yahoonewsphotos:

Iran mother spares life of son’s killer in dramatic turn of events

An Iranian mother spared the life of her son’s convicted murderer with an emotional slap in the face as he awaited execution with the noose around his neck, a newspaper reported Thursday. The dramatic climax followed a rare public campaign to save the life of Balal, who at 19 killed another young man, Abdollah Hosseinzadeh, in a street fight with a knife back in 2007. (AFP)

(Photos by Araash Khamooshi/ISNA/AFP)

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(via globalpost)

Only unreal things can break

By bringing shame to a person, how could one expect to make him a better man?

—Yamamoto Tsunetomo (via your—reflection)

Meditation on inevitable death should be performed daily. Every day when one’s body and mind are at peace, one should meditate upon being ripped apart by arrows, rifles, spears and swords, being carried away by surging waves, being thrown into the midst of a great fire, being struck by lightning, being shaken to death by a great earthquake, falling from thousand-foot cliffs, dying of disease or committing seppuku at the death of one’s master. And everyday without fail one should consider himself as dead.

Yamamoto Tsunetomo (via wolfe-zedrick)

there is something…

elina-astra:

"There is something to be learned from a rainstorm. When meeting with a sudden shower, you try not to get wet and run quickly along the road. But doing such things as passing under the eaves of houses, you still get wet. When you are resolved from the beginning, you will not be perplexed, though you will still get the same soaking. This understanding extends to everything.” 


Yamamoto Tsunetomo

The Hagakure: A code to the way of samurai